On Becoming Color-blind

Dear Y.B.M.:

I trust that you are winning over racism.

In this short note, I would like to say a word to you about becoming color-blind.

America is a multicultural society. America is not just made up of white and black, but of all colors, races, nationalities, and tongues. If you are going to be a leader in this country, you had better shed your “black thing” mentality and become color-blind in your dealings with all people. To help you with this concept, here are some suggestions:

1. I have had the privilege of traveling all over the world, and believe it or not, all people are basically the same. No matter where they come from, or what language they speak, all people desire the same things, for the most part.

2. Learn how to speak the universal language of love. You must develop a loving heart for all people. Smile and shake hands. They are just as afraid of you as you are of them.

3. Show an interest in other people’s culture and ways. Ask them questions. Learn a few words of their language. Eat their food. (By the way, I would strongly encourage you to learn how to speak Spanish and Chinese fluently, in light of the new, global economy.)

4. When you get the opportunity, please travel as much as you can. You will get a perspective on life that you can’t get any other way. From traveling, you will understand what I mean when I say, all people are basically the same.

5. If you can’t travel, please take the time to read about other people and their way of life. There are many good videos out that will help you become more cosmopolitan.

I hope you will learn quickly this valuable lesson, and that is, people are really just people.

Yours for being Color-blind and at the Same Time Keeping it Real,

Daniel

P.T.:
It is never too late to give up our prejudices. – Henry David Thoreau

Prejudice is opinion without judgement. – Selected

Until justice is blind to color, until education is unaware of race, until opportunity is unconcerned with the color of men’s skins, emancipation will be a proclamation but not a fact. – Lyndon B. Johnson

This chapter is an excerpt from my book, Mo’ Letters to Young Black Men: More Advice & Encouragement for a Difficult Journey. Click here to find out more or to purchase the book online.